Special Populations

SPECIAL POPULATIONS AND VISUAL REHABILITATION

Vision can be compromised as a result of neurological disorders or trauma to the nervous system as well as conditions such as developmental delays, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, sensory integration disorders and genetic syndromes. Vision therapy can effectively treat the visual consequences of trauma, help develop visual skills, and train skills for improved body and spatial awareness.

AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER (ASPERGER SYNDROME)

Behavioural Optometry offers a number of therapy options to help people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) develop the visual skills necessary for improved social and academic function. Simply training eye movements can enhance visual attention and eye contact. Yoked prism glasses can help centre attention and decrease extreme upward gazing, while vision therapy can assist in the development and integration of visual skills. Syntonics can also help decrease hypersensitivities.

TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

Traumatic brain injury sufferers commonly have some visual complications. Blurred and/or double vision are often present, but considered as something that must be learned to be lived with. Vision therapy can help retrain many visual, spatial and developmental skills. Helping to reintegrate vision with movement and sound can greatly improve the quality of life of a person who has suffered a brain injury.

FRAGILE-X

People with Fragile-X exhibit many behaviours in common with those with learning disabilities. Luckily they learn well by mimicking others, hence people with Fragile-X can benefit greatly from vision therapy, which teaches skills including body and spatial awareness, eye-hand coordination, visual-motor and auditory integration, and visual sequencing skills.

DOWN SYNDROME

People with Down Syndrome often have visual problems requiring spectacle correction and/or vision therapy. Regular vision assessments are recommended.